Beacon Hill Boston MA Neighborhood

Today, Beacon Hill is regarded as one of the most desirable and expensive neighborhoods in Boston. Beacon Hill, one of the oldest and most picturesque neighborhoods in the United States, is a thriving residential community and a popular tourist destination, located just a short walk from Boston’s theater district. This charming historic region, with its Federal, Greek Revival, and Victorian architecture is known for its historical landmarks, and its many antique shops, boutiques, and fine eating and drinking establishments. The area, approximately one-half to three quarters of a mile square, is bounded by Cambridge Street on the north, Somerset Street on the east, Beacon Street on the south, and Storrow Drive on the west. The Massachusetts State House, with its magnificent gilded dome, is a prominent landmark on Beacon Street just across from the Boston Common, a popular park enjoyed by residents and tourists alike.

The South Slope, is an elegant residential community suitable for the aristocratic residents, dubbed Boston Brahmins, who purchased them. Between 1800 and 1850, although a few stately free-standing mansions were built on the South Slope, most of the homes constructed during this period were adjoining brick row houses, with either flat or bow fronts, built in the Federal style popularized by Bulfinch, or Greek Revival Style homes, inspired by the interest in everything Greek that swept across America during the 19th century. Prominent on the South Slope are charming brick sidewalks, gaslights, some cobblestoned streets, homes with tall narrow windows, sometimes with purple glass, doors with elaborate brass knockers, wrought iron railings, flower boxes, and beautiful hidden gardens.

Over the years, most of the Boston Brahmins and other wealthy residents moved away from Beacon Hill, making new homes in the suburbs. Now many of the stately residences that they occupied have been converted to small apartments or condominiums for the prosperous professionals who live there and work close by. Since the area was legislated as a historic distinct in 1955, concerted efforts have been made to preserve the area’s period architecture. A walk down one of the many picturesque streets on the South Slope can feel like one is being magically transported back in time to an earlier, more elegant, era.

The last area to be developed in Beacon Hill is called The Flat of the Hill, a region stretching from Charles Street to Storrow Drive. Its main streets are Charles Street, which is named for the fact that the area was built on a portion of the Charles River, and Cambridge Street. The earth used to create the Flat of the Hill came from removing the peaks of Beacon Hill and filling in a portion of the Charles River with the earth that was excavated. The work was done by almost two hundred “pick and shovel men” and dozens of oxen to haul the earth to its final destinations.

Other sites to visit in Beacon Hill include Louisburg Square, the most exclusive neighborhood on the South Slope, complete with its own gated private park; Acorn Street, only one block long with a cobblestoned road, reputed to the most photographed street in the country; the Otis House Museum, built in 1796, and the Nichols House Museum, built in 1804, which contain furnishing and artifacts typical of the period; the Boston Athenaeum, a private library holding a collection of historically important books and works of art; Holmes Alley that led runaway slaves to the safety of the African Meeting House; The Liberty Hotel, a luxurious hotel that was once a prison, located at the foot of Beacon Hill; and Cheers, the bar made famous in the television series of the same name.

Beacon Hill, one of the oldest and most picturesque neighborhoods in the United States, is a thriving residential community and a popular tourist destination, located just a short walk from Boston’s theater district. This charming historic region, with its Federal, Greek Revival, and Victorian architecture is known for its historical landmarks, and its many antique shops, boutiques, and fine eating and drinking establishments. The area, approximately one-half to three quarters of a mile square, is bounded by Cambridge Street on the north, Somerset Street on the east, Beacon Street on the south, and Storrow Drive on the west. The Massachusetts State House, with its magnificent gilded dome, is a prominent landmark on Beacon Street just across from the Boston Common, a popular park enjoyed by residents and tourists alike.

To Experience Exceptional Real Estate Services In Beacon Hill Boston